On-Site Museum Programs

Noah's Yankee Doodle: Fun with Early American Music and Language

Preschool- Grade 3
This program includes songs from Noah Webster's period with demonstrations of musical instruments. There will be opportunities to sing along and discuss how songs are used as a means of expression
Grades 4-6
Presents songs from Noah Webster's lifetime, including songs that were used to influence American opinions or behavior during the early days of American Independence.
Program length for either program is 45 minutes. These presentations are available as an on-site or outreach program. Fee: $160.00 for the first session and $75.00 for each additional session. Roundtrip mileage charged for Outreach Programs. Maximum number of students in 50

Jr. Sampler of Early American LifeEarly american life school programs

What was it like to be a child in the 1700s?  Students find out by exploring our historic house, attending a "dame" school, and trying out different types of children's work.  Program led by costumed museum teachers.  Grades K- 2. Program length: 1 hour. Fee: $6/student. Minimum: 18 students, Maximum: 50 students.

ADD ON! Colonial Amusements
What did children do for fun? Further your students' experience by playing the games children enjoyed over 200 years ago. Add 1 hour to program, $4/student. Maximum: 60 students. Grades 2-8.

How the Natives Lived

Who lived here before the colonists? Through sensory experiences, students actively learn about the native peoples of Connecticut, including their housing, clothing, tools, and games. Taking place in our colonial house, students will compare and contrast Native American life to that of the colonists, thinking about the ways the two groups would have interacted. Students will hear a traditional Native American story and each make their own clay pinch pot to take home. Grades K-3. Program length: 1 hour. Fee: $6/student. Minimum: 18 students, Maximum: 60 students.

ADD ON! Native Cooking
What types of food did Native Americans eat? Further your students experience by cooking corn cakes over an open fire! Add 1/2 hour to program, $4/student. Maximum: 60 students.

Sampler of Early American Life

What was it like to live in the 1700s? Students explore our historic house to learn about colonial clothing, foods, and medicines, while also trying their hand at 18th-century "women's" and "men's" work. Program led by costumed museum teachers. Grade 3 and up. Program length: 1 1/2 hours. Fee: $7/student.
Minimum: 18 students, Maximum: 50 students.

ADD ON! Colonial Schoolhouse
What was colonial school like? Further your students' experience by attending a colonial school, using primers, slates, and quill pens. Add 1 hour to program, $4/student. Maximum: 60 students.

ADD ON! Hearth Cooking
What types of food did colonial people eat? The ultimate colonial experience! Students will help make "Flatjacks" over an open fire when you add this element to any of our Sampler programs. Add $4/student.

 

sampler of early american lifeA Day of Living History

How did colonial families live, work and play? A day in the life of a colonial character! Students research and play the roles of families who lived in Noah Webster's neighborhood in 1774. Led by our costumed museum teachers, students move through our house while doing chores, attending school, dancing, playing games, and cooking their own lunch on an open hearth. Use of our pre-visit materials is required. Grade 4 and up.  Program length: 4 hours. Fee: $18/student. Minimum: 20 students, Maximum: 60 students.

Town Meeting

What issues led to the American Revolution? At a 1774 town meeting, Hartford colonists voted to stop trade with England in response to policies that they thought were unfair. Role-playing Patriots versus Loyalists, the students move through our historic house while discussing the issues of the day with our costumed museum teachers. Then they have a chance to vote during their own 1774 town meeting. Use of our pre-visit materials is required. Grade 5 and up. Program length: 1 1/2 hours. Fee: $9/student. Minimum: 20 students, Maximum: 50 students.

Noah Webster: Language, Literacy & Legacy

How does Noah's legacy continue to affect us today? This interdisciplinary program combines language arts and history to look at how Noah Webster contributed to American language and the way we learn. Students explore how language has changed over time through group activities, discover Noah's contributions to American education in a 19th-century schoolhouse, visit our brand new exhibit, “Noah Webster: Defining American,” and investigate historical objects in Noah's childhood home. Grade 5 and up. Program length: 2 hours. Fee: $8/student. Minimum: 20 students, Maximum: 50 students.

Human Rights Role-Play

How did your race, sex, and status affect the way you were treated in the 1700s? In this role-play, students use the historic house as a stage to explore what life might have been like in 1775 Connecticut if they were white, black, free, or slave. Students are assigned characters that span race, sex, and status and, led by costumed museum teachers, must complete a series of related tasks. A follow-up allows students to share experiences and make connections to today. Use of our pre-visit materials is required. Grade 6-12. Program length: 1 1/2 hours Fee: $8/student. Minimum: 20 students, Maximum: 60 students.

History Explorers for Title 1 Schools

History Explorers Program for Title 1 schools helps under-privileged children experience history through three separate, dynamic, and engaging experiences. Contact the Education Department for more details and funding possibilities. 860-521-5362 x14.

 

History Explorers programs are proudly sponsored by The William and Alice Mortensen Foundation.